wisteria-spirit:

this is so important

wisteria-spirit:

this is so important

(Source: octopussoir-, via nanqijala)

(Source: vi0lettae, via nanqijala)

richardmac:

Painted a Rohirrim for my dad’s upcoming birthday! He’s a huge Lord of the Rings fan; I blame him almost entirely for getting me hooked.

richardmac:

Painted a Rohirrim for my dad’s upcoming birthday! He’s a huge Lord of the Rings fan; I blame him almost entirely for getting me hooked.

(via thestonecuttersguild)

trevsplace:

Sandman vol. 1 no. 1"Sleep of the Just”January, 1989Sam Kieth and Mike DringenbergInk on boardEarlier this year, San Francisco’s Cartoon Art Museum featured a Sandman exhibit. While that exhibit has run its due course, there’s always something worth checking out there, so be sure to add it to your itinerary should you happen to be in the area. The Sandman exhibit may have come and gone, but it’s forever preserved (or at least until my hard drive dies) in the form of digital iPhoto album. I have the gal at the museum’s reception desk, who was kind enough to allow me to take non-flash photography photos, to thank for that. I’ll pay her kindness forward by sharing a few select photos I took while there - but not all-at-once. Where’s the fun in that? I’ll start this ball rolling with a photo of Sandman vol. 1, number 1, page 1.

trevsplace:

Sandman vol. 1 no. 1
"Sleep of the Just
January, 1989
Sam Kieth and Mike Dringenberg
Ink on board

Earlier this year, San Francisco’s Cartoon Art Museum featured a Sandman exhibit. While that exhibit has run its due course, there’s always something worth checking out there, so be sure to add it to your itinerary should you happen to be in the area. The Sandman exhibit may have come and gone, but it’s forever preserved (or at least until my hard drive dies) in the form of digital iPhoto album. I have the gal at the museum’s reception desk, who was kind enough to allow me to take non-flash photography photos, to thank for that. I’ll pay her kindness forward by sharing a few select photos I took while there - but not all-at-once. Where’s the fun in that? I’ll start this ball rolling with a photo of Sandman vol. 1, number 1, page 1.

(via neil-gaiman)

natural-magics:

Etsy shop preview: pink/purple/golden/rainbow flash labradorite wrapped in antique brass wire <3

natural-magics:

Etsy shop preview: pink/purple/golden/rainbow flash labradorite wrapped in antique brass wire <3

(via daughter-of-odin)

drrestless:

peira:

Peder Mørk Mønsted:  Sunset over a Danish Fjord (1901)

“Il sole splendeva, senza possibilità di alternative, sul niente di nuovo.” Samul Beckett, “Murphy” (via ali3natamente)

drrestless:

peira:

Peder Mørk Mønsted:  Sunset over a Danish Fjord (1901)

Il sole splendeva, senza possibilità di alternative, sul niente di nuovo.” Samul Beckett, “Murphy” (via ali3natamente)

zanetheaiden:

zanetheaiden:

date a boy with nice cheek bones

date a boy who has a good taste in clothes

date a boy with a great laugh

date a boy who’s hoodie you can borrow

date a boy with fantastic collarbones

date a boy who smiles constantly

date a boy with arms like damn

image

(via vampishly)

art-of-swords:

Why a sword feels right
by Randy McCall
Many readers will have had the experience of shopping for modern, practical cutting swords, both replicas of ancient swords and modern designs. One of the most common tips given to new sword-shoppers is to pick up and try out many different swords “until you find one that feels right for you”. Rarely is any explanation given for precisely what this means.
Shoppers presume it has something to do with whether the hilt is the right size for their hand, or that it has something to do with the sword’s “balance”… whatever that is.
Some lucky few will have had the chance to handle high quality antique weapons.  Those who have are often shocked that these blades — often of the same weight and length as the modern replica blade they use at home — have a completely different “feel”.
Often master blades seem lighter than than their actual weight, with a sense of “liveliness” (easy to rotate in the hand), and with the feeling to make almost effortless cuts or thrusts. This isn’t to criticize the sword makers of today — there are master swordsmiths around the world — but to demonstrate the skill and genius of the weapon makers of old.
The basic question then is why is there a difference between how these swords feel, and how can a sword practitioner use this knowledge to their advantage? There have been a number of papers, articles and discussion threads on this topic, often delving into physics formula to define and explain mathematically how and why a sword feels, moves and strikes as it does.
One of the main resources for this will be “Dynamics of Hand-Held Impact Weapons” by George Turner; a fairly technical exploration of the physics behind why swords handle as they do (and an indispensable resource for those interested in designing good swords). There are also several other articles, plus web forum discussion threads, which explore this area which we’ll draw on.
Never fear though; we’ll leave the calculations behind and focus on the practical applications. Those who wish to see the maths can check the links in the Sources section.
So, let’s start off with a few basics. We’ll presume that the swords you’re looking at are well designed, have properly sized hilt grips, etc., so we can ignore the ergonomic factors.
A sword has several physical characteristics which can affect both its feel in the hand and how it handles. Let’s take a look at these, along with examples of how you would check these while inspecting your blade…
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Art of Cutting

art-of-swords:

Why a sword feels right

  • by Randy McCall

Many readers will have had the experience of shopping for modern, practical cutting swords, both replicas of ancient swords and modern designs. One of the most common tips given to new sword-shoppers is to pick up and try out many different swords “until you find one that feels right for you”. Rarely is any explanation given for precisely what this means.

Shoppers presume it has something to do with whether the hilt is the right size for their hand, or that it has something to do with the sword’s “balance”… whatever that is.

Some lucky few will have had the chance to handle high quality antique weapons.  Those who have are often shocked that these blades — often of the same weight and length as the modern replica blade they use at home — have a completely different “feel”.

Often master blades seem lighter than than their actual weight, with a sense of “liveliness” (easy to rotate in the hand), and with the feeling to make almost effortless cuts or thrusts. This isn’t to criticize the sword makers of today — there are master swordsmiths around the world — but to demonstrate the skill and genius of the weapon makers of old.

The basic question then is why is there a difference between how these swords feel, and how can a sword practitioner use this knowledge to their advantage? There have been a number of papers, articles and discussion threads on this topic, often delving into physics formula to define and explain mathematically how and why a sword feels, moves and strikes as it does.

One of the main resources for this will be “Dynamics of Hand-Held Impact Weapons” by George Turner; a fairly technical exploration of the physics behind why swords handle as they do (and an indispensable resource for those interested in designing good swords). There are also several other articles, plus web forum discussion threads, which explore this area which we’ll draw on.

Never fear though; we’ll leave the calculations behind and focus on the practical applications. Those who wish to see the maths can check the links in the Sources section.

So, let’s start off with a few basics. We’ll presume that the swords you’re looking at are well designed, have properly sized hilt grips, etc., so we can ignore the ergonomic factors.

A sword has several physical characteristics which can affect both its feel in the hand and how it handles. Let’s take a look at these, along with examples of how you would check these while inspecting your blade…

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Art of Cutting

(via vampishly)